timothydelaghetto:

turnerejg:

fleshbeing:

veralynn23

Valerie Hegarty

Famous paintings come to life in 3D sculptures of nature’s destructive tendencies.

Wow I really like this

Wow

(Source: veralynn23, via wurstaufschnitt)

taddle:

numb-ly:

IM LAUGHING SO FUCKING HARD HELP

OMG

(Source: youtube.com, via dutchster)

“Filipino artist Noel Cruz transforms mass-produced dolls to create stunningly realistic one-of-a-kind figures of celebrities.” 

(Source: facebook.com, via nerdsarein)

cat3o4:

whatpunkin:

porcelainandgold:

tripster-and-the-mad-hatter:

glossynympheteyes:

this movie is so fucking creepy jesus fuck

It’s by Tim Burton, what did you honestly expect?

Actually, it’s Henry Selick, who was the director of The Nightmare Before Christmas. The book was written by Neil Gaiman, though, and is far…far….worse.

Sorry, I’m about to geek the hell out.

The movie is captivating, but the book is twenty kinds of terrifying, even now, ten years after I first read it. As disturbing as the movie may have been to some, the things Selick added really serve to cushion just how horrific the story really is.

First of all, the character of Wybie does not exist in the book. Coraline is facing all of this nearly alone, with her only help coming from the sly comments of the cat, a warning from the circus mice, and the stone given to her by her neighbor, presented with no comment but that it “makes the unseen seen.”

Second, the Other Parents are never quite as warm (and, dare I say, normal) as they are in the gifs above. They’re described as having paper-white skin and the Other Mother’s hair is said to move on its own, and her long, red, claw-like nails don’t ease any uncertainty that she is absolutely, positively up to no good. The first time Coraline meets them, they (and the rest of the Others) seem to be playing roles (for whatever reason, Coraline does not seem to pick up on this), like they all know what to say and what to do and are simply waiting for Coraline to make her move in their terrifying play world. This is shown to be partly true when the Other Parents tell her they know she’ll be back soon after she refuses the buttons - this time, to stay.

Third, the Other Mother commits atrocities that really should not have been in a book for anyone not fully grown up. She physically deforms the world around Coraline to slow her progress in their game beyond any mild traps the movie portrays, and, instead of turning the Other Father into the wandering pumpkin-thing seen in the film, she simply ceases to use him and throws his body away in the cellar, leaving him to rot with whatever bit of sentience he has left. She begins to lose her touch, as Coraline gains the upper hand. Her world doesn’t just become a nightmare - it falls apart completely. No creepy but oddly cool bug furniture here, just the house that now appears to be a child’s drawing. Whatever the Other Mother is (a beldame, but something tells me she’s much more ancient and powerful than that), she does not give half a hump about what she has to do to ensnare Coraline. Destroy the supporting characters of her twisted creation? Done. Allow herself to be dismembered to ruin Coraline’s life in the normal world? Not even gonna bat an eyelash.

On a final, personal note, imagine eight year-old me, ignored by my parents, absorbed in the story and identifying with Coraline from the start. Imagine me finishing this bloodcurdling book and immediately thinking of my basement, where there is still a locked door that my grandmother swears up and down is nothing more than a storage room, but has not once in my (or my mother’s) lifetime unlocked.

Can you see why this book still scares me?

well shit man

(via nerdsarein)

mr-mononucleosis:

lunalovegouda:

The intro cards for Futurama have always been one of my favorite parts of the show because people always talk about the old Simpson’s couch gag but this is just pure gold… I mean-

It goes from everything from 

image

image

and then they made fun of how much everyone reacted to the the infamous ‘dead dog episode’ that I cried about…

image

image

image

And then one time when the show got canceled…

image

and then when it came back..

image

you’re missing my favorite one though

image

(via dutchster)

brandnewandancientsnogbox:

“I’ve poked my head into theaters in L.A. for that moment just to hear people gasp,” director Marc Webb tells EW. “It’s fascinating. People just don’t believe it.” Webb understands. He felt much the same way when Gwen Stacy was killed off in the comic. “It stayed with me in a profound way. It broke me. I was anxious and curious to explore it on the screen. From the very beginning I planned on doing it,” he says. “For me, everything in the movie was built around that moment. There’s a cost to being a hero.”

But there was another theme that greatly interested Webb: “[The movie] is also about time and about valuing the time you have with the one you love,” he says. He points out that the very first shot of the film is a ticking clock, and that its first line is Richard Parker saying, “I wish I had more time.” Time is the underlying theme of Gwen’s valedictorian speech, and her last fateful moments take place where? At a clock tower.  “Ultimately, it’s not the Goblin that kills Gwen,” says Webb. “They’re fighting in the cogs, in the machinery of the clock tower, and Spider-Man puts his foot in between the cogs and literally tries to stop time. That’s what causes her death—his inability, despite his enormous efforts, to stop time.”

(x)

(via nerdsarein)

owlturdcomix:

Love is complicated.

(via tastefullyoffensive)

mechsae:

shadowdestroyer:

electricsed:

All the flavor, none of the bigotry!

I must try this.

Same. To the pantry! (tomorrow-ish) 

(Source: wamwanfood, via mindoku)